parliment flags

Is BT a service provider, or an infrastructure owner? Failure to properly deal with this question during its privatisation in 1984 has been a source of numerous allegations by rivals about margin squeeze and unfair cross subsidisation, particularly over unbundling the local loop. True and effective competition within the UK telecoms market is not possible without a network in third party ownership. Ofcom’s proposals In July 2016, Ofcom set out its competition concern that BT has the ability and incentive –Read More–

Recent years have seen a significant increase in the number of private competition claims in the European Union. The Claimants’ Guide to Antitrust/Competition Litigation in the European Union provides an overview of the process for recovering compensation for breaches of competition law before the national courts of an EU Member State as well as the likely impact of Brexit on such actions. Please follow this link to read the guide.  

On 21 December 2016, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) handed down an interesting interpretation of jurisdictional issues in cross-border competition law and online sales. The ECJ ruled that courts of a Member State have jurisdiction to hear an action to establish liability for infringement of a prohibition on sales via marketplace websites based outside such State where such sales are alleged to have harmed the party in the first Member State. On 16 March 2012, “Concurrence”, a French retailer –Read More–

On 1 July 2016, the German Ministry for Economic Affairs published a draft bill for the 9th amendment of the German Act against Restraints of Competition (Gesetz gegen Wettbewerbsbeschränkungen – GWB). The draft bill addresses numerous topics which have been subject to intensive discussions in German competition policy and will bring material changes to German antitrust law. 1. Expanded system of sanctions and fines One of the main pillars of the 9th amendment of the GWB is the introduction of –Read More–

The City of London Law Society Competition Committee has just published its response to the CMA Consultation on “Mergers: Exception to the duty to refer in markets of insufficient importance”. The Committee argue for the adoption of a single de minimis threshold, the level of which should be set at least £15 million, substantially above the current lower threshold of £3 million. Please follow this link to read the full response. Robert Bell is a Partner and Head of EU & Competition –Read More–

One of the advantages of Brexit is that the UK will be free to agree its own trade deals with the rest of the world for the first time in nearly 50 years. However, until the UK formally leaves the European Union the EU Commission in Brussels has exclusive competence to negotiate trade deals on behalf of the European Union. So whilst the UK can commence trade talks, it is not allowed under its international treaty obligations with the other –Read More–

On January 12, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ), collectively the “Agencies” issued an update to the 1995 Antitrust Guidelines for the Licensing of Intellectual Property (IP) (the 2017 Guidelines and the 1995 Guidelines, respectively). The 1995 Guidelines set forth the Agencies’ analytical framework on how it assessed the antitrust ramifications of IP-related actions. The 2017 Guidelines incorporate changes, from the past twenty years, in regulations, antitrust jurisprudence, the Agencies’ –Read More–

On 2 February 2017, the EU Commission simultaneously launched three investigations into the e-commerce sector. What is significant about this latest development is that it shows that e-commerce is a clear priority area in antitrust enforcement, and that the Commission is willing to attack perceived anti-competitive practices head-on. The investigations focus on (1) video games, (2) hotel price discrimination and (3) consumer electronics manufacturing. The video games inquiry is directed at the largest PC game distribution platform, Steam, and its –Read More–

Reverse cross border mergers could become a popular device for UK companies seeking to maintain and preserve “passporting” or other EU rights. The mechanism of a reverse cross-border merger (in this context whereby a UK parent company merges with their continental European subsidiary) has not historically been permitted under English law. However the provisions of an EU directive implemented in the UK in 2007 changed that position giving UK company groups that option. The reverse cross border merger mechanism was designed –Read More–

On January 13, 2017, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ,” collectively the “U.S. Agencies”) issued an update to the 1995 Antitrust Enforcement Guidelines for International Operations (the “2017 Guidelines and the “1995 Guidelines,” respectively). The 1995 Guidelines set out for international businesses the U.S. Agencies’ international antitrust/competition law enforcement policy, including but not limited to how it cooperates with other antitrust/competition law authorities and how it utilizes its investigative –Read More–